Names and Titles of God: so many but…

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Names and Titles of God

These audio files from the same website providing manner of pronunciation of selected words mentioned

 

The name of God in Judaism used most often in the Hebrew Bible is the four-letter name יהוה (YHWH), also known as the Tetragrammaton. El (god), Elohim (god, singular and plural form, depending on the context), El Shaddai (god almighty), Adonai (master), Elyon (highest) and Avinu (our father) are regarded by many religious Jews not as names, but as epithets or titles highlighting different aspects of YHWH and the various ‘roles’ of God.

Chapter 1. The Tetragrammaton (YHWH)

The name of God in Judaism used most often in the Hebrew Bible is the four-letter name יהוה (YHWH), also known as the Tetragrammaton. The Tetragrammaton appears 6,828 times in the Biblia Hebraica Stuttgartensia edition of the Hebrew Masoretic Text. It first appears at Genesis 2:4

Genesis 2:4
English: King James Version (1611) - KJV

4 These are the generations of the heavens and of the earth when they were created, in the day that the LORD God made the earth and the heavens,  

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and is usually translated as the LORD in many English language Bibles, although Jehovah or Yahweh are employed in others. The Hebrew letters are (right to left) Yodh, He, Waw and He (יהוה). It is written as YHWH, YHVH, or JHVH in English, depending on the transliteration convention that is used. YHWH is thought to be an archaic third person singular imperfect of the verb “to be” (meaning, therefore, “He is”). This interpretation agrees with the meaning of the name given in Exodus 3:14
Exodus 3:14
English: King James Version (1611) - KJV

14 And God said unto Moses, I AM THAT I AM: and he said, Thus shalt thou say unto the children of Israel, I AM hath sent me unto you.  

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where God is represented as speaking, and hence as using the first person (“I am”). The name ceased to be pronounced in Second Temple Judaism, by the 3rd century BCE.[2] Rabbinical Judaism teaches that the name is forbidden to be uttered except by the Kohen Gadol (High Priest) in the Temple on Yom Kippur. Throughout the service, the High Priest pronounced the name YHWH “just as it is written”[citation needed] in each blessing he made. When the people standing in the Temple courtyard heard the name they prostrated themselves flat on the floor. Passages such as: “And, behold, Boaz came from Bethlehem, and said unto the reapers, YHWH [be] with you. And they answered him, YHWH bless thee.” (Ruth 2:4
Ruth 2:4
English: King James Version (1611) - KJV

4 And, behold, Boaz came from Bethlehem, and said unto the reapers, The LORD be with you. And they answered him, The LORD bless thee.  

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), indicates the name was still being pronounced at the time of the redaction of the Hebrew Bible in the 6th or 5th century BCE. The prohibition against verbalizing the name did not apply to the forms of the name within theophoric names (the prefixes yeho-, yo-, and the suffixes -yahu, -yah) and their pronunciation remains in use. Modern Jews never pronounce YHWH, and especially not “Yahweh”, as it is connotated with Christendom.[citation needed] Instead, Jews say Adonai. The Jewish Publication Society translation of 1917, in online versions, uses YHWH once at Exodus 6:3
Exodus 6:3
English: King James Version (1611) - KJV

3 And I appeared unto Abraham, unto Isaac, and unto Jacob, by the name of God Almighty, but by my name JEHOVAH was I not known to them.  

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